🎦 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring full movie mp4 hd 1080p download, 1080p download The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring full movie mp4 hd. 🎬
The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
Year:
2001
Country:
USA, New Zealand
Genre:
Drama, Action, Adventure, Fantasy
IMDB rating:
8.8
Director:
Peter Jackson
Alan Howard as The Ring
Noel Appleby as Everard Proudfoot
Sean Astin as Sam
Sala Baker as Sauron
Sean Bean as Boromir
Cate Blanchett as Galadriel
Orlando Bloom as Legolas
Billy Boyd as Pippin
Marton Csokas as Celeborn
Megan Edwards as Mrs. Proudfoot
Michael Elsworth as Gondorian Archivist
Mark Ferguson as Gil-Galad
Ian Holm as Bilbo
Christopher Lee as Saruman
Elijah Wood as Frodo Baggins
Storyline: An ancient Ring thought lost for centuries has been found, and through a strange twist in fate has been given to a small Hobbit named Frodo. When Gandalf discovers the Ring is in fact the One Ring of the Dark Lord Sauron, Frodo must make an epic quest to the Cracks of Doom in order to destroy it! However he does not go alone. He is joined by Gandalf, Legolas the elf, Gimli the Dwarf, Aragorn, Boromir and his three Hobbit friends Merry, Pippin and Samwise. Through mountains, snow, darkness, forests, rivers and plains, facing evil and danger at every corner the Fellowship of the Ring must go. Their quest to destroy the One Ring is the only hope for the end of the Dark Lords reign!
Type Resolution File Size Codec Bitrate Format
1080p 1920x1080 px 3790 Mb h264 2320 Kbps mkv Download
DVD-rip 480x234 px 792 Mb mpeg4 504 Kbps avi Download
iPhone 320x156 px 327 Mb h264 266 Kbps mp4 Download
Reviews
Excellent
Incredible adaptation of the first book of J.R.R. Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings" trilogy. I'm not going to summarize the story--there's way to much going on. All I'll say is they took a verry difficult book with a intricate plot and made it an exciting, totally accesible movie. The film moves quickly (with a few slow spots--but that's to get in the plot) and there's a lot to take in, but I was never confused. I should mention that I tried twice to read the books but found them too hard.

The film looks magical--Middle Earth looks beautifully real. All the special effects are great (the Ring Wraiths are downright terrifying--as they should be) and the action sequences are among the best I've ever seen--fast, long and breathtaking. The film is long (2 hrs, 40 min) but the time flies by. The only problem is that there's so much plot and action going on that you're exhausted by the end--but in a good way.

With the exception of Viggo Mortensen (very wooden) all the actors are good--top honors go to Elijah Wood, Dominic Monaghan, Cate Blanchett, Liv Tyler and (especially) Ian McKellan.

But the film is VERY violent (despite the PG-13 rating). It deserves an R--this is NOT one for the kids. Still, it's the best film of 2001. SEE IT!!!!
2002-01-03
As good as any movie can get!
This movie keeps me glued to the television every time i watch it. For all fantasy lovers this movie is a must-see! You will not be disappointed one minute through this three hour movie. You will be begging to see the next movie. The whole cast in this movie was absolutely brilliant. It made you feel as though you were really in middle earth. I love this movie and it is dear to my heart. I've watched it a hundred times a swear. Yet i never seem to get sick of it. Peter Jackson could have never done a better job if he tried. He should be very proud and i know he made the author of all the lord of the rings books proud.
2005-06-27
Awesome
I know it's been out for a while, but it is still awesome. Great cast of actors. Awesome work!! I have not enjoyed a movie so much in my life, I could watch it over and over and over if I had the time, but of course I have to do something constructive with my life and my employer won't stand for it.
2003-02-23
Wow!
Breathtaking. Unique. Captivating. Enchanting.

Within minutes of the start of this first chapter of an undeniably epic trilogy, the audience was left gasping at the intensity of the images on the screen. And we had nearly three hours to go.

The scope of Tolkien's masterpiece may have eluded film-makers for decades, but director Peter Jackson makes good on his promise: he has not only brought us the tale of Frodo and his bold companions, he has brought us Middle Earth. And believe me, it is BIG. Sweeping vistas and hang-onto-your-seat camera shots send us zooming through the towering cities and citadels of Tolkien's imagination.

But even more impressive than the stunning visuals and sound-effects-like-you've-never-heard-before are the actors who breathe life into the characters. Ian McKellen's portrayal of Gandalf is nothing short of awe-inspiring, and Elijah Wood's Frodo is one of the most unexpectedly captivating performances I've seen in a long time. The despair, terror, and determination of the Fellowship is all there, in spades. I left the theater aching...from tensing every muscle during the fight and flight sequences--the breathless and compelling kind we haven't seen since Spielberg gave us a desperate charge onto the D-Day beaches of Normandy.

Those unfamiliar with Tolkien's world may quickly find themselves lost in it, but happily so. The depth of his creation cannot be grasped in a few hours, and it doesn't need to be; the struggle of good against evil explodes on the screen, and leaves little room for complaint.

The movie ended with a stunned audience sitting on the edges of their seats, feeling somewhat bereft. We were exhausted, but no one wanted to wait a year for more.

Jackson's ambitious first chapter is truly unlike anything you've seen this year. George Lucas and Chris Columbus take note: this is how you deliver on a cinematic promise.

For everyone else: don't you dare miss it.
2001-12-11
A sight to behold
Growing up, my dad would always tell me his favorite books were The Lord of the Rings volumes. But I was never interested in fantasies, so I didn't really care. Then I found out that Peter Jackman was making the movies so I told my dad. He became really excited. But still, I didn't care. Until one night in November, when they showed the LOTR special on TV. I was able to catch only the first ten, fifteen minutes and instantly, I wanted to see the movie. I had never read the books. My dad took me and my family to see the movie. I was a bit excited and curious to see how they would do it. Mind you, I knew next to nothing about this story.

I sat through the entire three hours in Middle Earth and fell in love with it. Through parts, I would clutch on my brother's arm, tense and hoping that everyone will make it through a lot of the sticky situations they were in. I fell in love with Legolas and his graceful Elf self. The minute the movie began, I was drawn in. The special effects were terrific. I felt like I was there. I wanted (and still do) to live in Rivendell among the Elves. The backdrops for the movies was fantastic. Sir Ian McKellan's quote about how New Zealand is Middle Earth is so true.

I was very impressed with the casting. I'm a huge movie buff so I have seen plenty of movies and I won't be lying when I say that LOTR has the best casting ever. Every person, the mains and the extras, WAS the character they played. The make-up was incredible. The orcs creeped me out. The Elves entranced me. The Hobbits brought a smile to my face. Elrond, Hugo Weaving, is the perfect Elf King, firm and commanding, yet with love for his people and respect for Frodo. I could go on and on, but I won't.

I loved the fact how PJ was able to make the Hobbits look small in every single scene. I would LOVE to know HOW in the world they did that. I love how the Elves are so graceful and look ethereal.

I know that the movie is three hours long and people balk at that. I took a friend of mine who hasn't seen the movie because it was three hours long. He loved it. He was engrossed and he had never read the book either. This movie is one of the, if not THE, finest piece of work I have seen. I eagerly await "The Two Towers" and "The Return of the King". I definitely recommend this movie for everyone to see at least once. I have seen it four times and will see it yet again soon. I can never get bored of this movie. Go. See it.

I leave you with a quote from Gandalf: "All we have to decide is what to do with the time that we are given"
2002-04-13
An epic worthy of it's hype
The long awaited live action adaption of the classic Tolkein novel Lord of the Rings more than justified the massive hype surrounding it. Simply put, it is one of the best movies I've ever seen. I have not been so utterly blown away by a film in a long time like I was when I saw this. Every, and I mean every, aspect of this film is executed flawlessly. The ensemble performances are truly fantastic, especially by Wood and McKellan. All I can say is I can't wait for it to be released on DVD and I can't wait for The Two Towers and Return of the King to come to theatrical release. I think we have finally seen the arrival of a trilogy that matches the magnitude of the original Star Wars trilogy. 10/10
2002-07-02
Excusable flaws don't detract.
There's a very obvious problem when transferring any book to the big screen, namely that some of us may already have seen it.

It's not that the story holds no surprises (save for the occasional controversies that surround the fate of characters like Hannibal Lecter), it's just that many of us have already read the book, and thus we've already directed our own version of the story. We've already seen it in our mind's eye.

And this is the problem that plagues The Fellowship of The Ring. You'll see a lot of reviews here proclaiming it as nothing short of the second coming of cinema, and a few that dare to knock its serious shortcomings. Let me clear this up right now.

The first issue that many may raise is that this is not a faithful adaptation of the book. Quite right, while taking pains to ensure that they stayed faithful to the novel, Jackson et al have not simply been able to lift their screenplay directly from its pages without a few necessary changes. There is a great deal of mindfulness in the film about the portion of the audience (and it will be large) who are unfamiliar with the novels.

Accordingly a great deal more emphasis has been placed upon pacing and storytelling more appropriate to a classic film narrative. Hence we need to see Gandalf's protracted bid to escape the clutches of Isenguard interspersed with the Hobbit's journey to Rivendell. It simply isn't appropriate to expect an audience to bear with the Hobbits' journey, no matter how good the actors are or how enthralling the story is, for upwards of an hour without constant reminders of the films other protagonists OR the threat of the evil they face. Having Gandalf just turn up at Rivendell and tell his story via CGI-filled flashbacks simply wouldn't have had the necessary effect.

Secondly, the omission and reworking of characters. Yes, it was sad that Bakshi felt his animation didn't need Tom Bombadill, and given that he features strongly in Tolkien's other works this has to be frowned upon by the die-hard fanatics, but introducing diverting, but ultimately pointless episodes into the list of the challenges the Hobbits face is hardly going to keep you riveted to your seat is it? I mean, a man who stops the Hobbits being eaten, very slowly, by a tree with his power of song is just quite frankly ludicrous in this day and age. The film is already stretching the audience's suspension of disbelief as far as it can go. Hence the chaff of Bombadill is cut. He isn't relevant to the rest of the story so he can be done without. It's sad for Tolkien fans for him not to be there but there's only so much celluloid available, even with a film this long.

And yes, Arwen Undomiel never saved Frodo from the Dark Riders, but please, remember your girlfriend needs to have something to sink her teeth into as well, not just midgets and men with beards looking mean or scared as they fight monsters. So, for gender representation and a bid to prevent half the potential market (please remember that like all film, this is a product to be packaged and sold) her character gets a drastic overhaul. Go sister!

There are numerous other issues relevant to the faithfulness of the adaptation from novel to screenplay but please, let's be content with what we've got here. It's a hard task to do all this well and Jackson, along with the rest of the boys and girls at Wingnut and WETA, should be commended for what they have achieved.

That said there are some definite flaws in the film, even those that can't be overlooked by justifying the needs to relate to the popcorn and nachos audience.

Firstly, we've got the Fellowship itself. Now, Merry and Pippin, while not really being established as Frodo's friends and thus not having the same kind of bond with him as they do in the novel are moderately well integrated. However, at the arrival of Boromir, Gimili and Legolas we just get left in the dark. None of these three characters, all representing important races, cultures and locations of the world of Middle Earth are given no more than token arrival-shots to introduce them, and little or no back-story as to how they came to be where they are or why they feel compelled to join Frodo's quest. Offering their various weapons is noble, and it sounds fantastic in the trailer, but when we finally get down to it we just don't know who they are or what they're about. Accordingly we don't ever really have time to care about any of these three, save for Legolas whose fighting proficiency alone makes him stand out. Sadly, Sean Bean is allowed little more than to switch from foreboding bad guy to friendly companion and back again (thus betraying his characters ultimate fate from the first time he opens his mouth) and John Rhys Davis is left with little more to do than scowl and look short. It doesn't help that both these characters seem to get a pretty raw deal for screen time, especially Gimli, who is barely in the film at all. We won't even begin to go into the seemingly superficial relationship we see between Sam and Frodo.

All of this is indeed a shame. The film's greatest strength after its story are its strong characters. However, whereas in the book they have the space to develop and flesh themselves out here they have little more to do than look in awe at Gandalf, perhaps not with a humble air so much as a wonder that he's being allowed to soak up all the screen time.

And yes, what you've heard is true; the fight sequences are shockingly bad. Well, perhaps that IS an overstatement. The fight sequences aren't exactly bad, they're riddled with good ideas and clever moves, but the camerawork and editing is so erratic that you'll have a hard time picking out anything to inspire awe or respect. The problem here is that the benchmarks for on screen fighting have all been established nowadays by The Matrix, Crouching Tiger and The Phantom Menace, and all of these films use lengthy shots to allow us to soak up the fight imaginative fight choreography, rather than have us crane our necks and dart about the screen with our eyeballs trying to glimpse it like a rare bird or nipple-flash at a premiere.

Now, these, yet again, are only a few of the problems. There's the geography of Middle Earth, some ropey special effects moments and the clumsy ending to deal with. But you can read the books and see the film for yourself; I've already typed enough about all that here.

BUT, now that I've just spent the main chunk of this review telling you about the shortcomings of The Fellowship of the Rings as both a movie and an adaptation let me tell you, it is good, exceptionally good.

There is no denying that the storyline itself, acting, effects, props, sets and so on and so forth are all spot on. Visually the film is a triumph and WETA has now, without question placed itself ahead of Industrial Light and Magic in terms of industry leading special effects. There are bags of style to proceedings, with some sequences displaying the sheer amount of vision of the whole team to bring somewhat vague sections of the novel to life.

All parts are played to perfection by the cast, and the casting is literally some of the best and most appropriate seen in years, none of this who-hot-and-who's-not Jerry Bruckheimer trash, it's a case of the best possible person for the part at every stage of the film. We'll give particular credit to Sir Ian Mckellan, Christopher Lee, Ian Holm and Elijah Wood again here. No doubt they've had scores of favourable and loving reviews already but these performances truly are worth mentioning just once again.

The film is a masterpiece from start to finish. Yes, it does take perseverance, no it's not entirely faithful to Tolkien's work and there are some serious flaws, but in a year that has been so barren of even five decent mainstream movies I think it's safe to say that no matter when this film had been released it would have outshone its competitors.

2001-12-19
An absolutely incredible film!
Simply incredible. Never before have I seen a 3 hour movie that didn't seem like 3 hours. I read the Lord of the Rings very recently and I was surprised at how similar Peter Jackson's vision was to my own.

Now about the omissions and alterations. I'm not a crazed fanatic who gets worked up over every little detail. I didn't mind Arwen's inflation and I'm actually glad Tom Bombadil was scrubbed (I felt Tom Bombadil was an unnecessary addition to the book). Despite these minor changes, the screenplay stays extremely close to the book and flows very very well (and the prologue was a nice touch).

The acting was flawless. As I've read many many times in other reviews, McKellen doesn't play Gandalf, he IS Gandalf. Wood, Mortensen, Holm, Astin, everyone was fantastic. My hat's off to Sean Bean who delivers an excellent performance as Boromir, a character who's intentions are good but wrestles with the corrupting power of the Ring. Bean portrays it VERY well. Oh, and Andy Serkis does a PERFECT Gollum voice. It's EXACTLY as I imagined it myself.

The special effects were incredible, the cave troll, the balrog, Gollum, and Sauron's Eye all looked amazing. I was also very impressed by the seamless shrinking of the vertically challenged characters.

What's wrong with this movie? I have no idea... I thought everything was perfect. MY biggest gripe is having to wait an entire year to see The Two Towers!
2002-05-02
The Lord of the Rings - An epic tale you will remember!
The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is a fantasy adventure based on the first volume of J.R.R. Tolkien's masterpiece The Lord of the Rings. Following the book, the film picks up the adventure with the hobbit Bilbo Baggins (Ian Holmes) celebrating his birthday in the peaceful town of Hobbiton. Bilbo bequeaths his prized magical ring to his nephew Frodo, played by Elijah Wood, while he himself leaves his home for one last adventure. Adventure finds Frodo, however, when the wizard Gandalf (Sir Ian McKellan) discovers that Frodo's new ring is really "the one ring of power" (Jackson, 2001) sought by the Dark Lord Sauron. Frodo must set out to destroy the ring by returning it to the fires of Mt. Doom where it was forged. He is guided by Gandalf, and aided by his gardener Sam (Sean Astin) and protected by a Fellowship that includes, Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen), Legolas (Orlando Bloom), Pippin (Billy Boyd), Merry (Dominic Monaghan), Gimli (John Rhys-Davis), and Boromir (Sean Bean). Christopher Lee plays a role as the wizard Saruman while Cate Blanchett, Liv Tyler, and Huggo Weaving make appearances as Elves.

The Lord of the Rings is a classic tale of Good vs. Evil and the struggle to overcome temptation in the face of corrupting power. Frodo must resist the power of the ring if he is going to return it to Mt. Doom, thereby destroying it. Frodo is set upon by beasts and ghouls throughout his journey and must even escape his own companions to achieve his goal. This archetypal theme of good vs. evil is also seen in Star Wars where Luke Skywalker must defeat the evil Empire while resisting the temptation to turn to the Dark Side. Both films show the triumph of unlikely heroes over incredibly powerful enemies.

The music in The Lord of the Rings was composed by Howard Shore, and is a thematic element that enhances the overall feeling delivered by the film. There are many journeys within the film, and the music helps to establish the transitions from one journey to the next, such as when the fellowship was leaving Rivendell to begin their trip to Mordor. The music also enhances the dramatic element during scenes that involve the temptation of the ring, or scenes that show the components of evil.

Another element that contributes to the theme is the use of lighting. The scenes involving the dark lord and the ringwraiths are dark and gloomy. During the meeting at Rivendell, Gandalf spoke in the tongue of Mordor and the lighting quickly darkened and changed the mood of the scene. However, when Frodo first awoke at Rivendell, everything was very bright and colorful. Through lighting techniques, and sound effects, the director has created a film that helps control the intensity and mood of each scene throughout an epic tale that deals with good vs evil.
2010-10-30
📹 The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring full movie mp4 hd 1080p download, download The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring full hd 1080p movie. Nancy: Download The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring english subtitles i loved it. Subtitles is a very good human invention. Still I can add that I look through a lot of movies, including all genre Drama, Action, Adventure, Fantasy very much. My favorite film director - is of course Peter Jackson and Alan Howard, Noel Appleby, Sean Astin, Sala Baker, Sean Bean, Cate Blanchett, Orlando Bloom, Billy Boyd, Marton Csokas, Megan Edwards, Michael Elsworth, Mark Ferguson, Ian Holm, Christopher Lee, Lawrence Makoare, Elijah Wood acting is just wonderful. * Nichol: Long sought where I could find here download The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring HD and good downloading movie website on the site. * Terry: My favorite movie format is MKV and I download The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring MKV, I was just amazed at the quality. Recommened to all MKV format. 📀
×